Do You Know Where Your Nabisco Treats Are Made? Check the Label

The next time you plan to purchase cookies or other products of snack-maker Nabisco, check the label. If it’s not made in the U.S. or Canada, don’t buy it. Save your hard-earned dollars in support of IAM and other union jobs.         

Support the “Check the Label” campaign.

Mondelēz International, the Nabisco brand’s parent company, laid off 600 manufacturing workers last year in Chicago where a variety of Nabisco products are made. IAM members maintain the equipment at that location.

Mondelēz’s CEO has made more than $200 million in the past 10 years. Billions of dollars have gone back to the largest investors in dividends and stock buybacks. The consequences of this corporate greed have been disastrous to the members of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers (BCTGM) union who were laid off one year ago as the company shifted production to Mexico.

Never underestimate the power of unity however. The IAM, along with the other 54 AFL-CIO unions, is showing solidarity by supporting the “Check the Label” campaign and avoiding products Mondelēz outsources to Mexico and other countries.

“Nabisco’s actions represent a full-on assault on the middle class,” said IAM International President Bob Martinez. “The time has come for the U.S. and Canada to reinvest in our communities.”

Support North American jobs: Do not buy Nabisco products made in Mexico and tell your grocery store manager to stock American-made Nabisco products only.

How can you tell if your Nabisco snack is made in the U.S. or Canada? 

There are two ways to tell:

  1. Check for the words “Made in Mexico.”
  2. Check the plant identification code next to the product expiration date.

Do not buy if the letters MM or MS follow directly behind the product expiration date.

Get more information on the “Check the Label” campaign.

Or watch a short video on how you can support U.S. and Canadian workers.